Macbeth

Macbeth

Originally performed before King James I of England and King Christian IV of Denmark in 1606, Macbeth tells the tale of a villain-hero who stops at nothing to achieve his end. The play becomes lively with witches and ghosts, deaths, prophecies, regicide, banquets, hallucinations all neatly woven into a conflicting pattern of good and evil. The ''barren sceptre" creates a pathetic nightmare for the king who has to "dwell in doubtful joy". He has been immortalized by Shakespeare as a man of the Renaissance- one who believes that he has "supped full with horrors" assisted by the ministers of darkness and dies fighting a brave battle. Accompanied by a wife who is often identified as the Clytemnestra of Elizabethan tragedy; Macbeth acquires a grandeur (inspite of all evil) denied to other contemporary protagonists of English tragedy.

Author
William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.